May 23, 2022

Watching for Fraud: 4 Emerging Senior Scams in 2022

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While technology has its benefits, there’s a dark side as well: scammers looking to take advantage with new ways to commit fraud, especially against seniors, who are considered easier targets due to not being as familiar with new technologies and taking people more at their word.

It’s believed that around 3.5 million older adults were scammed out of a total of $3.5 billion in 2019.

In an effort to stay one step ahead of the swindlers, Centers Health Care has a look at four scams that are becoming more and more popular this year.

  1. Google Voice Scams

You probably know to keep your Social Security number and credit card numbers to yourself, but that now goes for verification codes from sites like Google. Scammers can get access to your phone number through social media listings—could be for selling an item or reaching out about a lost pet—and will call you. They will say they need to verify your identity and ask you to read off a code that is sent to you via text message. The scammers then set up a fake Google account in your name to take part in other online scams in your name.

  1. Rental Assistance

With rent skyrocketing and evictions taking place after the moratorium from the COVID-19 pandemic expired, con-artists are calling to say they’re from government agencies or nonprofit organizations that can help with assistance but first ask for a down payment to apply. It’s advised that you only apply to these types of programs if you seek out the agency’s help.

  1. Fake Job Offers

With much of the job application process taking place online now, career sites like Indeed and Monster. Scammers access information like email addresses and phone numbers to contact people and offer them high-paying jobs that do not exist. The catch: you have give more sensitive information (like a Social Security number) to get the job or buy expensive equipment from them in order to work from home.

  1. Amazon Scams

With Amazon being so popular, it’s no wonder that the Federal Trade Commission says that one-third of fraud complaints are regarding Amazon impersonators. Scammers will send text messages, emails, or place phone calls to say that there was suspicious activity on your account and you need to verify your information. The rule of thumb here is to contact Amazon yourself if there are any concerns by contacting customer support at 888-280-4331.

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